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p_lkrg:Examples [2018/01/24 20:35]
pi3 [Communication channel]
p_lkrg:Examples [2018/03/27 12:25] (current)
pi3 [Communication channel]
Line 45: Line 45:
   lkrg.force_run = 0   lkrg.force_run = 0
   lkrg.log_level = 1   lkrg.log_level = 1
 +  lkrg.random_events = 1
   lkrg.timestamp = 15   lkrg.timestamp = 15
  
Line 55: Line 56:
   - Force (lkrg.force_run) – forces LKRG to run integrity function right now. It is always visible as 0 number. Nevertheless,​ if you set it to 1, the integrity checking function will be immediately fired and value restored to 0 again   - Force (lkrg.force_run) – forces LKRG to run integrity function right now. It is always visible as 0 number. Nevertheless,​ if you set it to 1, the integrity checking function will be immediately fired and value restored to 0 again
   - log level (lkrg.log_level) – it might be a number between 0-4 or 0-6 (if debugging compilation was used). A strong debug provides very useful data to identify where could be a specific problem with LKRG (if it ever appears). Unfortunately,​ it produces tons of logs per execution and must be used only for debugging purpose, not as a normal run.   - log level (lkrg.log_level) – it might be a number between 0-4 or 0-6 (if debugging compilation was used). A strong debug provides very useful data to identify where could be a specific problem with LKRG (if it ever appears). Unfortunately,​ it produces tons of logs per execution and must be used only for debugging purpose, not as a normal run.
 +  - Random events (lkrg.random_events) - only two options are available:
 +    * 0 – do NOT perform integrity checking on the random events (perform it only at regular intervals configured by lkrg.timestamp)
 +    * 1 – perform integrity checking on the random events (as well as at the regular intervals)
   - timestamp (lkrg.timestamp) – changes how often kernel timer will be launched (kernel timer periodically calls integrity function). It can’t be less than 5 seconds (not to eat too much system resources) and not more than 1800 seconds (half an hour) – not to be silent for too long   - timestamp (lkrg.timestamp) – changes how often kernel timer will be launched (kernel timer periodically calls integrity function). It can’t be less than 5 seconds (not to eat too much system resources) and not more than 1800 seconds (half an hour) – not to be silent for too long
  
Line 85: Line 89:
   root@pi3-ubuntu:​~/​p_lkrg-main#​ sysctl -a |grep lkrg   root@pi3-ubuntu:​~/​p_lkrg-main#​ sysctl -a |grep lkrg
   lkrg.block_modules = 0   lkrg.block_modules = 0
 +  lkrg.clean_message = 1
   lkrg.force_run = 0   lkrg.force_run = 0
-  lkrg.log_level = 1 
-  lkrg.timestamp = 15 
   lkrg.hide = 0   lkrg.hide = 0
 +  lkrg.log_level = 0
 +  lkrg.random_events = 1
 +  lkrg.timestamp = 15
   root@pi3-ubuntu:​~/​p_lkrg-main#​ lsmod|grep p_   root@pi3-ubuntu:​~/​p_lkrg-main#​ lsmod|grep p_
   p_lkrg ​                ​94208 ​ 0   p_lkrg ​                ​94208 ​ 0
p_lkrg/Examples.txt · Last modified: 2018/03/27 12:25 by pi3
 
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